Gigs

A Place to Bury Strangers – Workman’s Club – 31-03-15

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A gig to mark in your calender for early next year, with ‘A Place to Bury Strangers‘ returning to our shores for a night in the Workman’s Club in early March. Their fourth album ‘Transfixiation’ will be released in February of next year. Their live shows have a reputation of being a little bit LOUD, so you can add ear plugs to your Christmas list.

A PLACE TO BURY STRANGERS – The Workmans Club – March 31st

4th album ‘Transfixiation’ (Dead Oceans, February 17th)

A place to bury strangers will play The Workmans Club on the 31st of March. Tickets €15.

 “There are moments where I’m really scared on stage,” admits A Place to Bury Strangers bassist Dion Lunadon, “where it’s really foggy and I know someone’s swinging a guitar around. I don’t give a fuck though; if a guitar is about to hit me in the head, oh well. It’s going to make for a better show.”

He should know. After joining the Brooklyn-based trio in 2010, it only took a few shows before Lunadon smashed his bass against his face. The freshly drawn blood trickled like rain off of a tin roof. But since the band often plays in the dark, he couldn’t actually see what happened. He had to keep going, and hope for the best.

“That’s the most intense fear and feeling—when you go to a show and you’re actually scared,” says frontman Oliver Ackermann, a co-founder of the soon-to-be-shuttered Death By Audio DIY space that’s hosted its fair share of frantic, life-affirming shows.

“Or you can palpably feel the danger in the music,” adds Lunadon, “like it’s going to fall apart at any moment and the players doing it are so in the moment they don’t give a shit about anything else. They’re just going for it. It’s a gutter kinda vibe; everything about it is icky and evil and dangerous.”

The same could be said for A Place to Bury Strangers’ fourth album, Transfixiation. Rather than fixate on precious recording techniques and minute details, the members of the group — Ackermann, Lunadon, and hard-hitting drummer Robi Gonzalez — trusted their instincts and tried to keep things as pure as possible. If that meant a mess of cross-contaminated microphones and mud-caked mistakes, so be it. Music is much more exhilarating when it’s unpredictable, and from the tortured straight-to-tape transmission of “I Will Die” and molten funk melodies of “Straight” to the violent guitar spasms, cannon-like drums and not-so-idle threats of “Deeper,” this is very much an unpredictable record. Gonzalez makes his recording debut with the band here and he’s helped push the band’s recorded sound closer to the intense level of its infamous live shows.

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